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    Interesting video, I wonder what type of investments negatively correlate with the entire stock/bond market? Gold perhaps? Not sure

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      For me the google docs is a pain, but the beancount and fava are really great.

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        The non Switzerland account doesn’t charge the stamp duty. IB is really good too, it is cheaper but I had more issues in comparison with Saxo.

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          Did you grow up in an area with a lot of snow?

          Western PA. Not as bad as MN but still pretty bad in that regard. Salt and ash is salt and ash, especially when it actually melts in PA.

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            Mark Spitznagel is a fairly interesting individual. Reading up on him with ~20 tabs open in my browser and a new book on my Kindle :)

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              My current car is turning 20 next year and I haven’t had too many issues with it. Some slight trouble with the battery, but otherwise okay. My previous car, on the other hand, was terrible. It was 3 years older than me and broke down maybe a dozen times. In college, I had to push it a mile to get it to the mechanic. I am not eager to replicate that situation.

              You say that an 8-12 year old car was breaking down constantly. Did you grow up in an area with a lot of snow? An 8-12 year car in California is normally alright, but I understand that in Minnesota an 8-12 year old car is a barely connected piece of scrap metal.

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                I agree. It is a quick way to become neurotic. All of a sudden everything you do costs 8x as much money if you put it in a 30 year investment context.

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                  I have bought two ~$25k cars new and will probably continue to buy at least one car new every 8 to 10 years.

                  In exchange, I’ve gotten significant peace of mind and time back. The cars that have always ended up in the shop for long periods of time or costing me money out of my emergency fund have been my used cars. the cars that are broke down on the road have always been the used cars.

                  I just recently dropped $3,000 on a repair for my one used vehicle because I could not find a replacement for it that would cost me less than approximately $300 per month over the course of the next year. I may be a little bit of a special case on that, because of the requirements of the particular large vehicle, but the sentiment stands.

                  I grew up with my parents buying $2,000 to $4,000 8-12 year old used vehicles every two or three years. They were constantly breaking down and constantly in the shop. We did not have reliable transportation and that had a certain mental toll on all of us.

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                    I’d love to see a simple getquote implementation around this web service.

                    $ getquote IBM
                    142.35
                    
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                      Short answer: I’m into it.

                      Long answer: As an American with family in Europe, I am always struck by how much more exposure my cousins had to other languages on a daily basis. In fact, you might say I’m a bit jealous! One of my Spanish cousins could sit down and watch German MTV. He could never speak it, but he understood what was going on just fine.

                      Besides language filtering, which has already been brought up, we also need to contextualize different localities. What does investment look like in the Netherlands vs the U.S. vs Argentina? Can people from one area actualize the insights provided by people from another area?

                      While providing space for other languages presents the possibility of creating a disjointed, fragmented community, we do stand to gain a more global perspective on investment, which is unique.

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                        A couple of years ago I was doing research to find a broker for index funds, and read some negative posts about DeGiro (see also the “critics” section on the WikiPedia page). I might give them a second look to see if they’ve cleaned up their act in the mean time. In any case, thanks for the tip!

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                          Sorry, I misunderstood your question. Any reasonable broker should provide access to REITs.

                          I’ve seen quite a few Degiro mentions on other forums, and their wiki says they provide access to over 60 exchanges, so that should hit the spot. Have you tried them?

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                            I agree with the sentiment, but this way of quantifying things always bothers me because you’re talking about $240k in 30 years. In the headline, I see $240k and I think how much money that is because I’m used to thinking about dollars in terms of the 2018 dollar. But you’re really talking about 2048 dollar which is probably worth a LOT less.

                            I mean if we’re lucky enough to live in a high inflation and high return environment, you could save a million bucks by riding a bicycle. Now that’s an even better headline.

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                              Thanks for your insightful reply! I never really considered playing the mortgage game, but now that you’ve twisted it like this, it kind of starts making a lot of sense.

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                                I’m a freelancer in my mid-20s so I think of adopting the more aggressive approach @yurtlife suggested.

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                                  The thing with high valuations is that there is less cushion if shit hits the fan. Obviously, when stock prices are high it’s because investors agree that conditions are favorable and they are projecting that into the future. However, corporate profit margins can’t continue growing to the sky and there’s a well thought out analysis here which examines various future scenarios for U.S. profit margins and their effect upon future CAPE 10 valuations.

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                                    My point is that there are good reasons (no major wars, low inflation) for CAPE to remain at its current levels and there is no indication it must revert back to its historical average anytime soon. It might as well be the other way around: CAPE remaining “elevated” for the next decade and the 10Y moving average catching up with it. I don’t think CAPE on its own means anything, just that when it’s high, bad unexpected events tend to have a greater impact..

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                                      I agree, but in all fairness it’s more of a “don’t try to time the market” kind of advice, rather than “buy at all time highs”.

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                                        You can also find the documentation here - https://aumayr.github.io/beancount-docs-static/ .

                                        That’s quite a relief.

                                        Or what problems do you face with Bitbucket?

                                        I just find Bitbucket’s UI so uninviting.

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                                          This only shows that being “close to an all time high” is not an argument against investing now. But that doesn’t make it an argument in favor of investing now. Some of these times were still less ideal times to step into the market.